Mariana-Boada and Tanya-Grant, Oncology

Nurse Residency Program

Become a Nurse Resident

Learn More Find a Nursing Job

Memorial Healthcare System: Enhancing the Spirit of Inquiry

Memorial’s Nurse Residency Program gives new nurses the tools they need for success. The program bridges the gap between the academic world and professional nursing practice. Residents focus on critical thinking skills and professional development and learn from each other as they complete the first year of their careers.

Why Choose Memorial’s Nurse Residency Program? 

Memorial’s Nurse Residency Program is more than an orientation. Your year as a nurse resident provides countless opportunities to expand your knowledge and experience and smooth your transition from school to nursing practice.

As a nurse resident, you will: 

  • Foster critical thinking skills: Interactive didactic sessions and case scenarios prepare you for the complex and challenging decisions you must make as a nurse. Learning how to problem solve will make you a more prepared nurse. 
  • Enhance your clinical competence: Our simulation lab provides hands-on practice and training. Residents learn how to start IV blood transfusions, insert urinary catheters and nasogastric tubes and more. You also learn how to care for patients with diabetes and other essential nursing skills. 
  • Connect with peers: Residents experience the program as a cohort, sharing successes and challenges along the way. This group cohesion lets you interact with and learn from your fellow nurses and build professional relationships. 
  • Learn effective communication: Share your thoughts and experiences as you participate in group discussions with your cohort. Your active involvement helps you communicate better with patients, families and leadership. 
  • Learn from professional educators: Clinical nurse educators guide your transition to independent nursing in your assigned unit. Our team of coordinators supports you throughout your first year. 
  • Gain confidence: Regular feedback and skills training builds your confidence as a nurse. Through structured learning, you start to feel more comfortable in your role.
Program Components

Cohorts start four times a year. Your experience as a nurse resident at Memorial includes:

  • Half-day orientation session
  • Two-day boot camp with hands-on practice in our simulation lab
  • Monthly series of interactive discussions on various topics, such as: 
    • Evidence-based practice
    • Ethics and end of life 
    • Interprofessional communication
    • Time management
    • Patient safety
    • Professional development
    • Resiliency
  • Career planning and counseling
  • Contact hours you can use toward your nursing licensure
 
Eligibility

To be eligible, you must either:

  • Be in your last semester of nursing school 
  • Have graduated from an accredited nursing program in the previous 18 months
  • Have worked fewer than six months as a registered nurse

You must also:

  • Be a licensed RN in Florida no later than seven days before your official start date
  • Have an active basic life support (BLS) certification

Become a Nurse Resident

Learn More Find a Nursing Job

Tracks

Each residency track offers you diverse learning opportunities and provides you with the chance to care for a unique patient population. You can apply for up to three tracks. 

Explore your areas of interest: 

Medical/Surgical/Telemetry

Med/Surg/Tele is a great specialty for new nurse graduates to begin their careers in nursing. It makes up the foundation of nursing practice and provides opportunities to better understand and collaborate with multiple disciplines and other nursing units. They’re responsible for taking care of patients with acute medical, neurological, and cardiac issues, as well as those requiring surgical intervention.

Many nurses who work in this practice area also excel at coordinating care for multiple patients at a time, while keeping the entire healthcare team working towards the same goals. They have high-level critical thinking skills and a wide range of clinical knowledge which set the stage towards their professional growth and development.

Med/Surg/Tele also offers several sub-specialties in areas such as:

  • Acute Inpatient Rehabilitation
  • Cardiac/Telemetry
  • General Surgical/Post-Op
  • Neurological/Stroke
  • Orthopedics

As an added incentive, new nurse graduates hired into Med/Surg/Tele areas would be eligible to apply for the RN Fellowship Program after completing the one-year Residency Program.

Average Nurse-to-Patient Ratio

5–6 patients to 1 nurse

Average Time on Orientation

12–14 weeks

This service line is accepting new nurse graduates at:

  • Memorial Regional Hospital
  • Memorial Hospital West
Oncology Services

Oncology nursing provides services that generate, implement, and educate patients and healthcare professionals on the science of cancer therapies, particularly as medical, radiation, cellular, and surgical options evolve to prevent, diagnose, and treat cancer as well as hematological conditions requiring acute nursing care. Nurses who work in oncology must be very detail-oriented because medication administration can be very complex.

Oncology nursing is a great career for nurses who enjoy ongoing relationships with patients and their families.

Average Nurse-to-Patient Ratio

  • 4–5 patients to 1 nurse
  • 3–4 patients to 1 nurse if post-op or on chemotherapy

Average Time on Orientation

18–22 weeks

This service line is accepting new nurse graduates at:

  • Memorial Regional Hospital
    • General Oncology
  • Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital
    • Pediatrics
  • Memorial Hospital West
    • General Oncology
Intermediate and Critical Care Services

Intermediate Care (IMCU) 

Intermediate Care (IMCU) is an area situated between the Intensive Care Unit and the general nursing units. This area provides a higher-level care without being in the ICU. A variety of diagnosis and care can be delivered in this environment with highly trained nurses. The patient population on those units require attention and care from a highly skilled nurse to deliver quality care and provide better outcomes. These units are very important to the hospital structure to meet the needs of the population.

Critical Care (ICU, PICU) 

Critical Care (i.e. ICU, PICU) is a service provided to patients with severe medical illnesses and life-threatening injuries. A variety of treatments are offered from monitoring, medicated drips, life sustaining procedures and high-tech equipment. These patients need highly trained healthcare providers who can critically think and deliver the best of care in a timely manner. It’s a fast-paced environment that requires thorough assessment skills and immediate action when changes in patient status occur.

Please Note: Adult ICUs are not currently accepting new nurse graduates.

Average Nurse-to-Patient Ratio

  • Intermediate Care: 3–4 patients to 1 nurse
  • Critical Care: 2–3 patients to 1 nurse 

Average Time on Orientation 

  • Intermediate Care: 20–24 weeks
  • Critical Care: 24–28 weeks

This service line is accepting new nurse graduates at:

  • Memorial Regional Hospital
    • Cardiac IMCU
    • Renal Transplant IMCU
    • Neuro IMCU
  • Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital
    • PICU
Emergency Services

Emergency nursing is a specialty focusing on the care of patients who require prompt medical attention to avoid long-term disability or death. In addition to addressing “true emergencies,” they increasingly care for people who are unwilling or unable to get primary medical care elsewhere and come to emergency departments for help. ED nurses treat everyone from newborns to the elderly, with every conceivable illness, injury or condition. The variety means that emergency nurses need to have top-notch critical thinking and prioritization skills as well as be highly proficient in any number of areas.

Average Nurse-to-Patient Ratio

4–5 patients to 1 nurse

Average Time on Orientation

22–26 weeks

This service line is accepting new nurse graduates at:

  • Memorial Regional Hospital
  • Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital
Neonatal Services

The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) dedicates itself to providing an environment where clinical expertise coexists with the belief that the strength of the healing process lies within the family unit. It is the philosophy of the NICU to maintain a safe environment, where health care professionals and families work together to provide the highest quality of care to our patients. They provide Level II and Level III neonatal intensive care services and fully equipped to care for the tiniest and most critically ill babies, offering the greatest range of neonatal services and support.

Average Nurse-to-Patient Ratio

2–3 patients to 1 nurse

Average Time on Orientation

16–20 weeks

This service line is accepting new nurse graduates at:

  • Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital
    • Neonatal ICU

Frequently Asked Questions

Program Curriculum

How do I enroll in the Nurse Residency Program?

Once we notify you of your acceptance you:

  • Complete an online learner profile two to three weeks before starting the program 
  • Review and electronically sign the Nurse Residency Program Training Agreement
  • Receive your invitation to the next Nurse Residency Program orientation
 
How long is the Nurse Residency Program?
The Nurse Residency Program is one year long.
Does this program replace the traditional orientation process?
The Nurse Residency Program supplements our traditional orientation process, focusing on building your critical thinking skills and supporting your professional development. You will also complete the traditional orientation process on your clinical unit.
What support will I receive as a resident?
Your support system includes the Nurse Residency Program coordinators, clinical nurse educators and unit preceptors. Each clinical area also provides advanced nursing education and support for new nurse graduates transitioning from direct observation to independent clinical nursing practice.

Application Process

How often do you offer the Nurse Residency Program?

The Nurse Residency Program runs four cohorts per year with two rounds of start dates within each cohort (except for winter):

 Cohort  Month Hired  Program Start Month(s)

 Winter

 Nov.-Jan.  Jan.
 Spring  Feb.-April  March and April
 Summer  May-July  June and July
 Fall  Aug.-Oct.  Sept. and Oct.

New nurse graduates hired as RN I in February, May, August, November and December would be employed and begin orienting on their unit in the actual month hired. They would enroll in the nurse residency program for the following program start month.

Who is eligible for the Nurse Residency Program?

New nurse graduates must meet the following criteria:

  • Be in the last semester of nursing school or a graduate of an accredited nursing program within the previous 18 months and worked six months or less as a registered nurse
  • Have an active basic life support (BLS) certification
Can I still apply if I haven’t taken the NCLEX or don’t have my results?

You may apply, interview and receive a job offer with the understanding that you must pass the NCLEX. You must have an active RN license no later than seven business days before your hire date. If you don’t meet the RN license deadline, we will defer you to the next cohort, or you may need to apply to the next cohort we offer.

You can also express interest in the program and receive notifications of upcoming application windows, information sessions and events.

Do I have to participate in the Nurse Residency Program to become employed as a new nurse graduate?
Yes, all new nurse graduates must enroll in the Nurse Residency Program at Memorial. 

Interviews and Candidate Selection

What should I expect once I complete my application?
  1. You will get an email letting you know we received your application.
  2. You will get an email from the Talent Acquisition team letting you know if you either:
    a. Qualify for next steps in the process 
    b. Don’t qualify for next steps
  3. If you qualify, you will get a call from the Talent Acquisition team to confirm or schedule next steps.

All application status updates are available in your candidate space online profile.

What should I expect during the interview process?

Candidates attend our in-person job fair Selection Day event to learn and explore different opportunities. You will meet hiring managers and nursing staff from participating units and choose where you would like to interview. We conduct interviews the same day.

We will notify you about your results at the event or 24 hours after your interview.

How many residents will you hire?
Department leaders decide how many positions we fill for each track.
If I’m not selected, will you consider me for other tracks?
We try to place nurse residents in an area that interests them, but that isn’t always possible. We may offer you a position on a unit that has an unfilled need.

Compensation and Work Commitments

Will I get paid and receive benefits if I’m hired as a new nurse graduate?

Yes, you will get paid and be eligible for benefits. You will earn the regular RN I rate for all hours you work during your residency. At the end of your first year, you will receive your annual evaluation. You will then be eligible for a pay increase according to our performance evaluation guidelines.

Learn more about benefits at Memorial Healthcare System.

Do I need to sign a contract?

All new nurse graduates must sign a two-year full-time commitment prior to enrollment into the Nurse Residency Program. Depending on which nursing unit you are hired into, you will be required to sign either one of the following agreements:

Standard Nurse Residency Program Training Agreement

  • Applies to new nurse graduates hired into patient care areas (i.e., Med/Surg/Tele, acute inpatient rehabilitation, etc.) This agreement is applicable to the facility and unit where the Nurse Resident will be hired.
  • Upon graduation from the program, you would be eligible to apply for a lateral transfer or the RN Fellowship Program after 1 year of independent practice experience.

Nurse Residency Program Specialty Area Training Agreement

  • Applies to new nurse graduates hired into most specialty units (i.e., all Pediatric Specialty Units, Adult ICU/IMCU, Emergency Department, Family Birthplace, Oncology, Surgical Services, etc.) This agreement is applicable to the facility and unit where the Nurse Resident will be hired.
  • You must remain in your assigned specialty unit for the entire duration of the two-year full-time commitment.

Both agreements run concurrently, and financial penalties are pro-rated.

Can I apply for a transfer to another role while I’m in the Nurse Residency Program?

No. All new nurse graduates (RN I) must remain in their assigned unit on a full-time basis while enrolled in the one-year program. Upon meeting requirements for graduation from the program, you would then transition to the job title of RN II. Eligibility for transfer post-residency depends on which training agreement you signed:

Standard Nurse Residency Program Training Agreement

  • You would be eligible to apply for a lateral transfer or the RN Fellowship Program after one year of independent practice experience.

Nurse Residency Program Specialty Area Training Agreement

  • You must remain in your assigned specialty unit for the entire duration of the two-year full-time commitment. Eligibility for lateral transfer or the RN Fellowship Program will apply once this agreement expires.

Please note, if the Resident chooses to apply for a transfer prior to completing either of the above agreements, additional administrative approvals will be required to allow transfer to occur as the Resident may have financial penalties associated with their signed agreement.

Work Schedule

What will my schedule look like during the program

Your schedule during the program:

  • When you start, you will complete several orientation and classroom requirements. 
  • You will work the same hours as your preceptor once you begin unit orientation. 
  • After you complete your unit orientation, you will take on regular shifts determined by your department leader. 
  • Your schedule will consider time you spend on residency program activities
Can I work part-time or per-diem while in the Nurse Residency Program?
No. New nurse graduates work full time for two continuous years from the date they enroll in the program.
Will I work nights, weekends and holidays?

Your work schedule and shifts depend on individual department needs. Most new nurse graduates get night shift assignments. Each unit has weekend and holiday requirements. New nurse graduates hired into specialties such as surgical services and procedural areas often get placed on an on-call schedule.

Please discuss scheduling concerns with the hiring nurse leader during the interview process.

Do you offer shift or weekend differentials?
Yes, nurse residents receive shift and weekend differentials depending on their schedules.
Can I take time off during the residency?
We strongly advise you not to make plans until you receive your onboarding schedule. The Nurse Residency Program requires mandatory attendance at monthly seminars during the one-year program. In addition to the program curriculum, the first four months of employment include a rigorous training and orientation schedule. 
Can I pursue an advanced degree while in the program?
Nurse residents go through a rigorous, unit-based orientation schedule and attend mandatory seminars in addition to regularly scheduled weekly shifts in their assigned unit. We strongly advise you to consider the time commitment required during the residency program before pursuing an advanced degree. 

Become a Nurse Resident

Learn More Find a Nursing Job